Showing posts with label Design Pattern. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Design Pattern. Show all posts

(Download) - Design Patterns in Swift


Discover the modern implementation of design patterns with Swift

What you'll learn

  • Recognize and apply design patterns
  • Refactor existing designs to use design patterns
  • Reason about applicability and usability of design patterns
  • Implement each pattern in a coding exercise

Requirements

  • Good understanding of Swift
  • Familiarity with latest Swift features
  • Good understanding of object-oriented design principles

Description

Course Overview

This course provides a comprehensive overview of  Design Patterns in Swift from a practical perspective. This course in particular covers patterns with the use of:

  • The latest versions of the Swift programming language
  • Use of modern programming approaches: dependency injection, reactive programming and more
  • Use of modern developer tools
  • Discussions of pattern variations and alternative approaches
This course provides an overview of all the Gang of Four (GoF) design patterns as outlined in their seminal book, together with modern-day variations, adjustments, discussions of intrinsic use of patterns in the language.

What are Design Patterns?

Design Patterns are reusable solutions to common programming problems. They were popularized with the 1994 book Design Patterns: Elements of Reusable Object-Oriented Software by Erich Gamma, John Vlissides, Ralph Johnson and Richard Helm (who are commonly known as a Gang of Four, hence the GoF acronym).

The original book was written using C++ and Smalltalk as examples, but since then, design patterns have been adapted to every programming language imaginable: Swift, C#, Java, PHP and even programming languages that aren't strictly object-oriented, such as JavaScript.

The appeal of design patterns is immortal: we see them in libraries, some of them are intrinsic in programming languages, and you probably use them on a daily basis even if you don't realize they are there.

What Patterns Does This Course Cover?

This course covers all the GoF design patterns. In fact, here's the full list of what is covered:
  • SOLID Design Principles: Single Responsibility Principle, Open-Closed Principle, Liskov Substitution Principle, Interface Segregation Principle and Dependency Inversion Principle
  • Creational Design Patterns: Builder, Factories (Factory Method and Abstract Factory), Prototype and Singleton
  • Structrural Design Patterns: Adapter, Bridge, Composite, Decorator, Façade, Flyweight and Proxy
  • Behavioral Design Patterns: Chain of Responsibility, Command, Interpreter, Iterator, Mediator, Memento, Null Object, Observer, State, Strategy, Template Method and Visitor
Who Is the Course For?

This course is for Swift developers who want to see not just textbook examples of design patterns, but also the different variations and tricks that can be applied to implement design patterns in a modern way.

Presentation Style

This course is presented as a (very large) series of live demonstrations. All demos are single-file, so you can download the file attached to the lesson and run it in CLion, XCode or another IDE of your choice (or just on the command line).

This course does not use UML class diagrams; all of demos are live coding. I use Visual Studio Code for the demos.

Who this course is for:

  • Beginner and experienced developers
  • Anyone interested in design patterns

(Download) - Boost Your C# With Structural And Creational Design Patterns


A complete guide to the first 12 structural and creational design patterns from the famous book by the Gang Of Four.

What you'll learn

  • Learn all 12 Structural and Creational Design Patterns
  • What's up with Singletons?
  • The benefit of the Prototype pattern
  • Reduce memory with a Flyweight
  • Expose subsystems with a Facade
  • Wrap legacy components with the Adapter pattern
  • The pros and cons of the Composite child management interface
  • Multi-step object construction with the Builder pattern
  • ... and much more!

Requirements

  • You need a Windows, Mac or Linux laptop with Microsoft Visual Studio, Xamarin Studio or Monodevelop
  • You should be a beginner, intermediate, or advanced C# developer
  • That's it!

Description


Updated November 22, 2017 - added a new promo video

In 1994 the "Gang of Four" published a book titled "Design Patterns: Elements of Reusable Object-Oriented Software". This book contains 23 fundamental software design patterns. It is regarded as the standard reference manual for object-oriented design theory and practice.

In this course I will teach you the first 12 design patterns. These are all 5 creational- and all 7 structural design patterns. You use these patterns to create new objects efficiently and to create structure in your application architecture.

By the end of the course you will be fluent in all 12 design patterns. With this knowledge you will be well on your way to become a Senior Application Architect.

Why should you take this course?

You should take this course if you are a beginner or intermediate C# developer and want to take your career to the next level. Some of the patterns (e.g. 'Bridge') might sound very complicated, but all of my lectures are very easy to follow, and I explain all topics with clear code and many instructive diagrams. You'll have no trouble following along.

Or maybe you're working on the application architecture of a large project, and you need to create a robust design that is instantly clear to your team members? The patterns in this course will help you immensely.

Or maybe you're preparing for a C# related job interview? This course will give you an excellent foundation to answer any software architecture questions they might throw at you.

30 day money-back guarantee

This course comes with an unconditional, Udemy backed, 30-day money-back guarantee. If you are dissatisfied with the course for any reason, simply request a refund and get your full purchase amount back, no questions asked.

Who this course is for:

  • Beginner, intermediate, and advanced C# programmers who want to learn the fundamental design patterns from the "Gang of Four".
  • Developers who are about to take a job interview and need to prepare for software architecture questions.
  • Professionals who are writing a section of mission-critical code in a large C# project

(Download) - Design Patterns in Modern C++


Discover the modern implementation of design patterns with С++

What you'll learn

  • Recognize and apply design patterns
  • Refactor existing designs to use design patterns
  • Reason about applicability and usability of design patterns
  • Learn how to use different aspects of Modern C++

Requirements

  • Good understanding of C++
  • Awareness of features of Modern C++ (11/14/17/...)
  • Understanding of OOP (encapsulation, polymorphism, inheritance)

Description

Course Overview

This course provides a comprehensive overview of Design Patterns in Modern C++ from a practical perspective. This course in particular covers patterns with the use of:

  • The latest versions of the C++ programming language
  • Use of modern programming approaches: dependency injection, use of coroutines, and more!
  • Use of modern developer tools such as CLion and ReSharper C++
  • Discussions of pattern variations and alternative approaches
This course provides an overview of all the Gang of Four (GoF) design patterns as outlined in their seminal book, together with modern-day variations, adjustments, discussions of intrinsic use of patterns in the language.

What are Design Patterns?

Design Patterns are reusable solutions to common programming problems. They were popularized with the 1994 book Design Patterns: Elements of Reusable Object-Oriented Software by Erich Gamma, John Vlissides, Ralph Johnson and Richard Helm (who are commonly known as a Gang of Four, hence the GoF acronym).

The original book was written using C++ and Smalltalk as examples, but since then, design patterns have been adapted to every programming language imaginable: Swift, C#, Java, PHP and even programming languages that aren't strictly object-oriented, such as JavaScript.

The appeal of design patterns is immortal: we see them in libraries, some of them are intrinsic in programming languages, and you probably use them on a daily basis even if you don't realize they are there.

What Patterns Does This Course Cover?

This course covers all the GoF design patterns. In fact, here's the full list of what is covered:

  • SOLID Design Principles: Single Responsibility Principle, Open-Closed Principle, Liskov Substitution Principle, Interface Segregation Principle and Dependency Inversion Principle
  • Creational Design Patterns: Builder, Factories (Factory Method and Abstract Factory), Prototype and Singleton
  • Structrural Design Patterns: Adapter, Bridge, Composite, Decorator, Façade, Flyweight and Proxy
  • Behavioral Design Patterns: Chain of Responsibility, Command, Interpreter, Iterator, Mediator, Memento, Null Object, Observer, State, Strategy, Template Method and Visitor
Who Is the Course For?

This course is for C++ developers who want to see not just textbook examples of design patterns, but also the different variations and tricks that can be applied to implement design patterns in a modern way.

Presentation Style

This course is presented as a (very large) series of live demonstrations being done in JetBrains CLion. Most demos are single-file, so you can download the file attached to the lesson and run it in CLion, XCode or another IDE of your choice (or just on the command line).

This course does not use UML class diagrams; all of demos are live coding.

Who this course is for:

  • Beginner and experienced C++ software developers
  • Developers interested in implementations of design patterns
  • Computer scientists

(Download) - Design Patterns in Java


Discover the modern implementation of design patterns with Java

What you'll learn

  • Recognize and apply design patterns
  • Refactor existing designs to use design patterns
  • Reason about applicability and usability of design patterns

Requirements

  • Good understanding of Java
  • Familiarity with latest Java features
  • Good understanding of object-oriented design principles
  • A computer with the latest JDK and (hopefully) an IDE

Description

Course Overview

This course provides a comprehensive overview of Design Patterns in Java from a practical perspective. This course in particular covers patterns with the use of:

  • The latest versions of the Java programming language
  • Use of modern programming approaches: dependency injection, reactive programming and more
  • Use of modern developer tools such as IntelliJ IDEA
  • Discussions of pattern variations and alternative approaches
This course provides an overview of all the Gang of Four (GoF) design patterns as outlined in their seminal book, together with modern-day variations, adjustments, discussions of intrinsic use of patterns in the language.

What are Design Patterns?

Design Patterns are reusable solutions to common programming problems. They were popularized with the 1994 book Design Patterns: Elements of Reusable Object-Oriented Software by Erich Gamma, John Vlissides, Ralph Johnson and Richard Helm (who are commonly known as a Gang of Four, hence the GoF acronym).

The original book was written using C++ and Smalltalk as examples, but since then, design patterns have been adapted to every programming language imaginable: C#, Java, PHP and even programming languages that aren't strictly object-oriented, such as JavaScript.

The appeal of design patterns is immortal: we see them in libraries, some of them are intrinsic in programming languages, and you probably use them on a daily basis even if you don't realize they are there.

What Patterns Does This Course Cover?

This course covers all the GoF design patterns. In fact, here's the full list of what is covered:

  • SOLID Design Principles: Single Responsibility Principle, Open-Closed Principle, Liskov Substitution Principle, Interface Segregation Principle and Dependency Inversion Principle
  • Creational Design Patterns: Builder, Factories (Factory Method and Abstract Factory), Prototype and Singleton
  • Structrural Design Patterns: Adapter, Bridge, Composite, Decorator, Façade, Flyweight and Proxy
  • Behavioral Design Patterns: Chain of Responsibility, Command, Interpreter, Iterator, Mediator, Memento, Null Object, Observer, State, Strategy, Template Method and Visitor
Who Is the Course For?

This course is for Java developers who want to see not just textbook examples of design patterns, but also the different variations and tricks that can be applied to implement design patterns in a modern way. For example, the use of recursive generics helps us build fluent interfaces even when inheritance is involved.

Presentation Style

This course is presented as a (very large) series of live demonstrations being done in IntelliJ IDEA and presented using the Kinetica rendering engine. Kinetica removes the visual clutter of the IDE, making you focus on code, which is rendered perfectly, whether you are watching the course on a big screen or a mobile phone. 

Most demos are single-file, so you can download the file attached to the lesson and run it in IntelliJ, Eclupse or another IDE of your choice.

This course does not use UML class diagrams; all of demos are live coding. I use IntelliJ and various Maven packages where necessary.

Who this course is for:

  • Software engineers
  • Designers
  • Architects

(Download) - Design Patterns in C# and .NET


Discover the modern implementation of design patterns with C# and .NET


What you'll learn

  • Recognize and apply design patterns
  • Refactor existing designs to use design patterns
  • Reason about applicability and usability of design patterns

Requirements

  • Good understanding of C#
  • Familiarity with latest C# features
  • Good understanding of object-oriented design principles

Description

Course Overview

This course provides a comprehensive overview of Design Patterns in C# and .NET from a practical perspective. This course in particular covers patterns with the use of:

  • The latest versions of C# and the .NET framework
  • Use of modern programming approaches: dependency injection, reactive programming and more
  • Use of modern developer tools such as ReSharper
  • Discussions of pattern variations and alternative approaches
This course provides an overview of all the Gang of Four (GoF) design patterns as outlined in their seminal book, together with modern-day variations, adjustments, discussions of intrinsic use of patterns in the language.

What are Design Patterns?

Design Patterns are reusable solutions to common programming problems. They were popularized with the 1994 book Design Patterns: Elements of Reusable Object-Oriented Software by Erich Gamma, John Vlissides, Ralph Johnson and Richard Helm (who are commonly known as a Gang of Four, hence the GoF acronym).

The original book was written using C++ and Smalltalk as examples, but since then, design patterns have been adapted to every programming language imaginable: C#, Java, PHP and even programming languages that aren't strictly object-oriented, such as JavaScript.

The appeal of design patterns is immortal: we see them in libraries, some of them are intrinsic in programming languages, and you probably use them on a daily basis even if you don't realize they are there.

What Patterns Does This Course Cover?

This course covers all the GoF design patterns. In fact, here's the full list of what is covered:

  • SOLID Design Principles: Single Responsibility Principle, Open-Closed Principle, Liskov Substitution Principle, Interface Segregation Principle and Dependency Inversion Principle
  • Creational Design Patterns: Builder, Factories (Factory Method and Abstract Factory), Prototype and Singleton
  • Structrural Design Patterns: Adapter, Bridge, Composite, Decorator, Façade, Flyweight and Proxy
  • Behavioral Design Patterns: Chain of Responsibility, Command, Interpreter, Iterator, Mediator, Memento, Null Object, Observer, State, Strategy, Template Method and Visitor
Who Is the Course For?

This course is for .NET/C# developers who want to see not just textbook examples of design patterns, but also the different variations and tricks that can be applied to implement design patterns in a modern way. For example, the introduction of the DLR allows us to use an ImpromptuObject, so that our DynamicObject exposes any interface we desire. This allows for dynamic programming, and many design patterns are presented in terms of their static and DLR-based variations.

Presentation Style

This course is presented as a (very large) series of live demonstrations being done in Microsoft Visual Studio. Most demos are single-file, so you can download the file attached to the lesson and run it in Visual Studio, Visual Studio Code, Rider or another IDE of your choice.

This course does not use UML class diagrams; all of demos are live coding. I use Visual Studio, various NuGet packages, R# unit test runner and even dotMemoryUnit.

Who this course is for:

  • Beginner and experienced developers
  • Anyone interested in design patterns